All posts tagged personal data

Privacy Training for Data Privacy Day

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Data Prviacy Data Privacy Awareness Training Courses 01

Data Privacy Day Logo 01

For Data Privacy Day this year, I’m happy to make available for the day two new short privacy training programs I created in collaboration with Intel.  Ordinarily, I require a login to view my training programs, but for this day, I have put them outside the wall for anyone to see.  So click on the programs below to watch them — I’ll keep them up through the weekend.  Then, they’ll go behind the wall, so you’ll need to request an evaluation login to see them afterwards.

NOTE: These programs are now no longer publicly available.  To see them, please contact us.

The first program is a short 2-minute awareness video about Data Retention.

The second program is an 8.5 minute program called Defining Personal Information.  It seeks to explain how to identify personal information, which is a tricky issue because what counts as personal information is not static and is contextual and contingent in some cases.

These programs were created for Intel with their collaboration.  Intel graciously allowed me to add generic versions of these programs to my training course library.   And in support of Data Privacy Day, Intel was encouraging of my making them publicly available.

I. Data Retention

Privacy Awareness Training Module - Data Retention

II. Defining Personal Information

Privacy Awareness Training Module - Defining Personal Information

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What Is Privacy?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Finger Print Iris Scan

By Daniel J. Solove

What is privacy? This is a central question to answer, because a conception of privacy underpins every attempt to address it and protect it.  Every court that holds that something is or isn’t privacy is basing its decision on a conception of privacy — often unstated.  Privacy laws are also based on a conception of privacy, which informs what things the laws protect.  Decisions involving privacy by design also involve a conception of privacy.  When privacy is “baked into” products and services, there must be some understanding of what is being baked in.

Far too often, conceptions of privacy are too narrow, focusing on keeping secrets or avoiding disclosure of personal data.  Privacy is much more than these things.  Overly narrow conceptions of privacy lead to courts concluding that there is no privacy violation when something doesn’t fit the narrow conception.   Narrow or incomplete conceptions of privacy lead to laws that fail to address key problems.  Privacy by design can involve throwing in a few things and calling it “privacy,” but this is like cooking a dish that requires 20 ingredients but only including 5 of them.

It is thus imperative to think through what privacy is.  If you have an overly narrow or incomplete conception of privacy, you’re not going to be able to effectively identify privacy risks or protect privacy.

In my work, I have attempted to develop a practical and useable conception of privacy.  In what follows, I will briefly describe what I have developed.

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