All posts tagged GDPR

Beyond GDPR: The Challenge of Global Privacy Compliance — An Interview with Lothar Determann

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

For multinational organizations in an increasingly global economy, privacy law compliance can be bewildering these days. There is a tangle of international privacy laws of all shapes and sizes, with strict new laws popping up at a staggering speed. Federal US law continues to fade in its influence, with laws and regulators from abroad taking the lead role in guiding the practices of multinational organizations. These days, it is the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) from the EU that has been the focus of privacy professionals’ days and nights . . . and even dreams.

As formidable as the GDPR is, only aiming to comply with the GDPR will be insufficient for a worldwide privacy compliance strategy. True, the GDPR is one of the strictest privacy laws in the world, but countries around the world have other very strict laws. The bottom line is that international privacy compliance is incredibly hard.privacy, privacy training, GDPR

This is what Lothar Determann focuses on. For nearly 20 years, Determann has combined scholarship and legal practice. In addition to being a partner at Baker & McKenzie, Lothar has taught data privacy law at many schools including Freie Universität Berlin, UC Berkeley School of Law, Hastings College of the Law, Stanford Law School, and University of San Francisco School of Law. He has written more than 100 articles and 5 books, including a treatise about California Privacy Law.

Hot off the press is the new third edition of Lothar Determann’s terrific guide, Determann’s Field Guide to Data Privacy Law: International Corporate Compliance.  Determann has produced an incredibly useful synthesis of privacy law from around the globe. Covering so many divergent international privacy laws could take thousands of pages, but Determann’s guide is remarkably concise and practical. With great command of the laws and decades of seasoned experience, Determann finds the common ground and the wisest approaches to compliance. This is definitely an essential reference for anyone who must navigate privacy challenges in the global economy.

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The Hidden Force That Will Drive GDPR Privacy Compliance

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

GDPR Compliance

 

The clock is ticking on getting ready to comply with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). EU regulators will start enforcing it on May 25, 2018.

GDPR is less than a year away, and it’s quite a challenge to get ready for. Becoming compliant is not something that can be achieved overnight, or in a week, or in a month, or even in quarter.  A lot of privacy and security controls must be put into place or adapted to satisfy new EU standards and rights.

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Preparing for GDPR: A Year to Batten Down the Hatches

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will go into effect on May 25, 2018.  The GDPR strengthens privacy protections in the EU and includes a number of additional rights and responsibilities.

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The U.S. Congress Is Not the Leader in Privacy or Data Security Law

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Capitol Sinking 01

A common myth is that the U.S. Congress is a leader in creating privacy and data security law.  But this has not been true for quite some time.  Congress isn’t leading, and even the policies and practices of US companies are increasingly built around the law of the European Union (EU) or the states.

In the 1970s through the end of the 1990s, the US Congress passed a large number of important privacy laws.  Here are some of the most prominent of these statutes:

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Congress’s Attempt to Repeal the FCC Internet Privacy Rules: The Void Will Be Filled

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

FCC Privacy Rules Repealed

Recently, Congress voted to overturn new FCC rules that regulated the privacy of broadband Internet Service Providers (ISPs).  The rules implemented the Communications Act, 47 U.S.C. § 222 to ISPs, requiring opt in for sharing sensitive customer data, opt out for sharing non-sensitive customer data, as well as transparency requirements.  Sensitive data includes precise geo-location, children’s information, health information, financial information, Social Security Numbers, Web browsing history, app usage history, and the contents of communications.  The rules required reasonable data security protections as well as data breach notification.

FCC LogoThis development is a setback in Internet privacy protection, but it doesn’t mean that Internet privacy is doomed.  There are many other regulators and sources of privacy law to fill the void.

Pro-industry advocates often decry much privacy regulation and cheer the death of rules such as the FCC rules.  They advocate for rolling back the jurisdiction and power of regulatory agencies like the FCC and FTC.

Ironically, efforts to weaken the FTC and FCC probably won’t lead to more freedom for industry.  In the short term after regulation is weakened or killed, there is a void, so this seems like a nice freer zone for companies..  But nature abhors a vacuum.  Other regulators will fill the void, and typically it is regulators who are most passionate about protecting privacy such as California and the EU.  They are far more likely to regulate privacy even more stringently than the FCC or FTC.

In the absence of federal regulation, many states pass laws that create a complicated patchwork of inconsistent regulation.  This is what happened with data security regulation and data breach notification.  Way back in 2005, after the ChoicePoint breach captured national headlines, Congress was considering enacting a law.  But it failed to act.  Instead, the vast majority of states passed data breach notification statutes, and many states passed data security laws.  Instead of having to comply with one law, companies must navigate laws in many states.  The most common strategy for companies operating in all states  is to try to follow the strictest state law,  Thus, the de facto rule is the law of the state with the most strict protections.

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GDPR Cartoon: Taking Privacy Seriously

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

cartoon-gdpr-training-privacy-shield-training-02

I created this cartoon to illustrate the fact that despite the increasing risk that privacy violations pose to an organization, many organizations are not increasing the funding and resources devoted to privacy.  More work gets thrown onto the shoulders of under-resourced privacy departments.

It is time that the C-Suite (upper management) wakes up to the reality that privacy is a significant risk and an issue of great importance to the organization.  Looming on the horizon is the enforcement of the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which will begin in 2018.  It’s never too early for organizations to start preparing.  GDPR imposes huge potential fines for non-compliant organizations — up to 4% of global turnover in many cases.  For more information, see the FAQ page I created about the GDPR and privacy awareness training.

Of course, the C-Suite may be quick to say that privacy is very important, but what matters most are the actions they take.  Privacy office budgets and sizes should be going up by a lot these days.

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Privacy Shield Training

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Privacy Shield Training Course

I have produced a new Privacy Shield training course that provides a short introduction to the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework.  Privacy Shield is an arrangement reached between the EU and US for companies to transfer data about EU citizens to the US.  Privacy Shield replaces the Safe Harbor Arrangement, which was invalidated in 2015 in the case of Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner.

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A New US-EU Safe Harbor Agreement Has Been Reached

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

EU-US Privacy Shield Safe Harbor Training

Last year, the death of the US-EU Safe Harbor Arrangement sent waves of shock and despair to the approximately 4500 companies that used this mechanism to transfer personal data from the US to the EU.  But a new day has dawned.

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Blogging Highlights 2015: Privacy Issues

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Privacy Training

I’ve been going through my blog posts from 2015 to find the ones I most want to highlight.  Here are some selected posts on privacy issues:

I. PHILOSOPHICAL

Privacy by Design:
4 Key Points

title image

What Is Privacy?

Solove Taxonomy of Privacy

II. PRIVACY LAW

Why All Law Schools Should Teach Privacy Law
— and Why Many Don’t

why law schools should teach privacy

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10 Implications of the New EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

EU GDPR Training General Data Protection Regulation

EU Flag EU Privacy TrainingLast week, the EU issued the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a long-awaited comprehensive privacy regulation that will govern all 28 EU member countries.  Clocking in at more than 200 pages, this is quite a document to digest.  According to the European Commission press release: “The regulation will establish one single set of rules which will make it simpler and cheaper for companies to do business in the EU.”

The GDPR has been many years in the making, and it will have an enormous impact on the transfer of data between the US and EU, especially in light of the invalidation of the Safe Harbor Arrangement earlier this year.  It will has substantial implications for any global company doing business in the EU.  The GDPR is anticipated to go into effect in 2017.

Here are some of the implications I see emerging from the GDPR as well as some questions for the future:

1. Penalties and Enforcement

Under Article 79, violations of certain provisions will carry a penalty of “up to 2% of total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year.”  Violations of other provisions will carry a penalty of “up to 4% of total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year.”  The 4% penalty applies to “basic principles for processing, including conditionals for consent,” as well as “data subjects’ rights” and “transfers of personal data to a recipient in a third country or an international organisation.”

These are huge penalties.  Such penalties will definitely be a wake-up call for top management at companies to pay more attention to privacy and to provide more resources to the Chief Privacy Officer (CPO).  Now we can finally imagine the CEO at a meeting, with her secretary rushing over to her and whispering in her ear that the CPO is calling.  The CEO will stand up immediately and say: “Excuse me, but I must take this call.  It’s my CPO calling!”

EU Privacy Training Money

To date, EU enforcement of its privacy laws has been spotty and anemic, so much so that many characterize it as barely existent.  Will the new GDPR change enforcement?  With such huge fines, the payoff for enforcement will be enormous.  We could see a new enforcement culture emerge, with more robust and consistent enforcement.  If privacy isn’t much of a priority of upper management at some global companies, it will be soon.

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