All posts tagged Cybersecurity

Phishing Cartoon: Signs of a Phishing Scam

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Misspelled words and bad grammar are tell-tale signs of phishing.   Why don’t phishers learn spelling and grammar?  Can’t they afford a copy of Strunk and White?

Phishers don’t need to spell better because their poorly-written schemes still fool enough people.  It’s just math for the phishers — a numbers game.   If you handle IT security at your organization, don’t assume that people won’t fall for obvious phishing scams — they do.   That’s why it is essential to train people — again and again.

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Law Firm Cybersecurity: An Industry at Serious Risk

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Last year, major incidents involving law firm data breaches brought attention to the weaknesses within law firm data security and the need for more effective plans and preparation. An American Bar Association (ABA) survey reveals that 26% of firms (with more than 500 attorneys) experienced some sort of data breach in 2016, up from 23% in 2015.

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The Funniest Hacker Stock Photos 3.0

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Hacker Santa

It’s time for a third installment of the funniest hacker stock photos.  Because I create information security awareness training (and HIPAA security training too), I’m always in the hunt for hacker photos.   There are so many absurd ones that I can make enough Funniest Hacker Stock Photo posts to keep pace with Disney in making new Star Wars movies!

If you’re interested in the previous posts in this series see:
The Funniest Hacker Stock Photos 2.0
The Funniest Hacker Stock Photos 1.0

So without further ado, here are this year’s pictures:

Hacker Stock Photo #1

Funniest Hacker Stock Photo - TeachPrivacy Security Awareness Training

This hacker hacks the Amish way — without the use of technology or electricity.   Who needs a computer when a good old magnifying glass will suffice?  The key to this technique is to be very sneaky.  For seasoned hackers who steadfastly believe in doing things the old-fashioned way, this is how it is done!   As this hacker says: “Yes, grandson, we had to walk six miles in the snow and hack with magnifying glasses . . . you young folks have it so easy these days!”

Hacker Stock Photo #2

Funniest Hacker Stock Photo - TeachPrivacy Security Awareness Training

Why use just one magnifying glass when you can use two?  Magnifying glasses are really important to read tiny text on computer screens.  Figuring out how to enlarge the font in Windows can be tricky, and good hackers figure out “hacks” to make things faster and easier.

Hacker Stock Photo #3

Funniest Hacker Stock Photos -- TeachPrivacy Information Security Awareness Training

I’m not entirely sure what this guy is doing, but I presume that he’s so good of a hacker than he can hack with the screen facing in the wrong direction.  The only problem is that there’s nothing on his computer screen — I think he needs to stop smiling and start working a bit harder.

Hacker Stock Photo #4

Funniest Hacker Stock Photos

In an earlier edition of this series, I commented extensively on hacker gloves.  In this edition, it’s time to turn to the masks hackers wear.  I’ve always wondered why so many hackers wear masks.  Isn’t a good hacker supposed to be hard to trace?  After extensive research, I have learned that hackers wear masks because when they hack from halfway across the world and try to conceal their tracks, they might somehow mess up and accidentally expose their faces from their webcams.   Or, maybe it’s just a fashion statement.  I still have more research to do about this very important question — I’m just waiting for some funding to support this important research.

Regarding the mask above, it’s part of a new trend.  Ordinary hackers wear ninja masks, but that’s starting to become a bit passe among hacker fashion experts.  Trend leaders are wearing much more elaborate masks these days.

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Notable Privacy and Security Books from 2016

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Here are some notable books on privacy and security from 2016. To see a more comprehensive list of nonfiction works about privacy and security, Professor Paul Schwartz and I maintain a resource page on Nonfiction Privacy + Security Books.

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Hacking Cartoon: All Too Easy

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cartoon Hacker Quits - TeachPrivacy Security Awareness Training

Hacking is easy.  My latest cartoon is based on the fact that many hacking attacks involve rather simple and common tactics.  Why try the hard stuff when the easy stuff works so well?  All it takes is for one person to fall for a social engineering trick, and the hackers can break in.

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Black Mirror: A Powerful Look at the Dark Side of Privacy, Security, and Technology

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Black Mirror Review

In a series of posts, I have written about some of my favorite media regarding privacy and security: TV shows, movies, and novels. When I wrote about TV shows, a number of people recommended the show Black Mirror. I have now seen all the episodes thus far, and I am happily adding it to the list. Black Mirror is essential watching in the canon for anyone interested in privacy, security, technology, and the future.

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Phishing Cartoon: Why Do Phishers Keep Sending Obvious Scam Emails?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Phishing Cartoon

Why do phishers waste their time with such obvious phishing scams when they can do so much better?

One possible answer: They don’t have to do better.  They send out so many emails that they only need a very low percentage of people to click.  And people always do.  In fact, if phishing emails became more effective, phishers might get too many clicks and might not be able to process it all!

To break into an organization, all the phishers need to do is to catch just one person. They don’t need to overphish the seas.  Victims are plentiful enough!

Don’t assume that people won’t fall for obvious phishing scams — they do.  That’s why it is essential to train people.  I am pleased to announce that TeachPrivacy now is offering a phishing simulator service.  We’ve teamed up with QuickPhish to provide a platform where organizations can conduct simulated phishing exercises for their workforce.  A great way to teach people not to fall for phishing emails is through direct experience.  When people wrongly click, our training can follow to teach them how to improve.

Phishing Simulator

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The Funniest Password Recovery Questions and Why Even These Don’t Work

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Passwords

 

A recent article in Wired argues that it is time to kill password recovery questions. Password recovery questions are those questions that you set up in case you forget your password. Common questions are:

In what city were you born?

What is your mother’s maiden name?

Where did you go to high school?

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Ransomware: A Cartoon to Brighten More Bad News

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Ransomware cartoon

I have good news and bad news about ransomware.  First, the good news — here’s a cartoon I created.  I hope you enjoy it, because that’s the only good news i have.  Now, for the bad news . . .

The Bad News: Be Afraid, Very Afraid

Everyone seems to be afraid of ransomware these days, but is the fear justified?  Is ransomware more about hype than harm?   Unfortunately, a recent study of international companies conducted by Malwarebytes provides some startling statistics to back up the fears.  According to the study, 40% of companies worldwide and more than 50% of the US companies surveyed experienced a ransomware incident in the last year.

The stakes are very high — 3.5% of companies surveyed even indicated that lives were also at stake which was exemplified by a recent attack in Marin, California where doctors lost access to patient records for over 10 days.

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Passwords Cartoon – Security Awareness Training

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cartoon Passwords - TeachPrivacy Security Awareness Training 01

Here’s a cartoon I created to illustrate the importance of security awareness training.  I hope you find it amusing.

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Attorney Confidentiality, Cybersecurity, and the Cloud

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Law firm data security

There is a significant degree of confusion and lack of awareness about attorney confidentiality and cybersecurity obligations.  This issue is especially acute when it comes to using the cloud to store privileged documents.  A common myth is that storing privileged documents in the cloud is a breach of attorney-client confidentiality.  In other instances, many attorneys and firms are not paying sufficient attention to their obligation to protect the confidentiality and security of the client data they maintain.

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6 Great TV Series About Privacy and Security

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

TVIn previous posts, I have listed some of my favorite novels and movies about privacy and security issues.  I don’t want to leave out TV, as there are some great TV series too.

 

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Ransomware on a Rampage

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Ransomware Training 01

Ransomware is on a rampage!  Attacks are happening with ever-increasing frequency, and ransomware is evolving and becoming more powerful.

Several major media sites, such as the New York Times, BBC, AOL, and the NFL, were recently infected with malware that directed visitors to sites attempting to install ransomware on their computers.

Ransomware Malware Training

Ransomware has the potential to attack the Internet of Things.  In one instance, a researcher was able to infect a TV with ransomware.

Ransomware is now attacking smart phones.

Last month, one hospital paid $17,000 in ransom when ransomware attacked its computer system.  The computer network was down for more than a week, and patients had to be transferred to other hospitals.

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Can the FBI Force Apple to Write Software to Weaken Its Software?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Privacy Awareness TrainingA dramatic legal battle is taking place that will have dramatic implications for the future of technology, privacy, security, and the extent of government power.  The FBI obtained an order from a magistrate judge to force Apple to develop software to help the FBI break into an encrypted iPhone.

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Information Security Training: Focus on the Human Problem

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Information Security Awareness Training Plan B

I created a new poster about information security training, which is debuting at the RSA conference.  This poster is based on the fact that the vast majority of information security incidents and data breaches occur because of human mistakes.   Information security is only in small part a technology problem; it is largely a human problem.

If you’re at RSA and are interested in information security awareness training, please drop by the TeachPrivacy booth at Moscone North 4802.

RSA Conference 2016

You can pick up a copy of this poster.  And you can also learn about our newest training, which includes a really neat Where’s Waldo style game where users spot privacy and security risks.

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Spot the Privacy and Security Risks Training Game

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Spot the Risks Privacy and Information Security Awareness Training

I’m pleased to announce a new training program:  Spot the Risks: Privacy and Security. The program is a Where’s Waldo style risk-spotting game that takes about 5 minutes to complete.  Trainees are asked to spot the risks in an office.  Feedback is provided about each risk so trainees learn many of the most important best practices.

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Notable Privacy and Security Books from 2015

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

title

By Daniel J. Solove

For several years, I have been posting about notable books on privacy and security, and this post lists some of the notable books from 2015.  To see a more comprehensive list of nonfiction works about privacy and security, you might consult this resource page that Professor Paul Schwartz and I maintain: Nonfiction Privacy + Security Books.

Now, without further ado, here are some of the many privacy and security books published in 2015:

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What Can We Learn From Bad Passwords?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Title

By Daniel J. Solove

The SplashData annual list of the 25 most widely used bad passwords recently was posted for passwords used in 2015.  The list is compiled annually by examining passwords leaked during a particular year.  Here is the list of passwords for 2015, and below it, I have some thoughts and reactions to the list.

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Can the FBI Force Apple to Write Software to Weaken Its Software?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

title image

A dramatic legal battle is taking place that will have dramatic implications for the future of technology, privacy, security, and the extent of government power.  The FBI obtained an order from a magistrate judge to force Apple to develop software to help the FBI break into an encrypted iPhone.

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The Ultimate Unifying Approach to Complying with All Laws and Regulations

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

The Ultimate Unifying Approach to Complying with All Laws and Regulations

Professor Woodrow Hartzog and I have just published our new article, The Ultimate Unifying Approach to Complying with All Laws and Regulations19 Green Bag 2d 223 (2016).  Our article took years of research and analysis, intensive writing, countless drafts, and endless laboring over every word. But we hope we achieved a monumental breakthrough in the law.  Here’s the abstract:

There are countless laws and regulations that must be complied with, and the task of figuring out what to do to satisfy all of them seems nearly impossible. In this article, Professors Daniel Solove and Woodrow Hartzog develop a unified approach to doing so. This approach (patent pending) was developed over the course of several decades of extensive analysis of every relevant law and regulation.

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Blogging Highlights 2015: Cybersecurity Issues

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cybersecurity Training

I’ve been going through my blog posts from 2015 to find the ones I most want to highlight.  Here are some selected posts about security:

The Worst Password Ever Created

worst password ever created

Should the FTC Kill the Password?
The Case for Better Authentication

title image

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Ransomware’s Dilemma: Pay It or Not?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Ransomware cybersecurity training

Ransomware is one of the most frightening scourges to hit the Internet.  Ransomware is a form of malware (malicious code) that encrypts a person’s files and demands a ransom payment to decrypt them.  If the money isn’t paid, the encryption keys are destroyed, and the data is lost forever.

Ransomware cybersecurity training

Ransomware began to emerge in 2009, and it has been rapidly on the rise.  Recently, it was ranked as the number one threat involving mobile malware.  According to one estimate, “at least $5 million is extorted from ransomware victims each year.”

Ransomware became a household name in 2013, when CryptoLocker infected about 500,000 victims in just 6 months.

Ransomware Cryptolocker security training 01CryptoLocker was eventually defeated.  But new variants of ransomware started popping up more frequently.

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The Kafkaesque Sacrifice of Encryption Security in the Name of Security

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

The Kafkaesque Sacrifice of Encryption Security in the Name of Security

By Daniel J. Solove

Proponents for allowing government officials to have backdoors to encrypted communications need to read Franz Kafka.  Nearly a century ago, Kafka deftly captured the irony at the heart of their argument in his short story, “The Burrow.”

After the Paris attacks, national security proponents in the US and abroad have been making even more vigorous attempts to mandate a backdoor to encryption.

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Does Cybersecurity Law Work Well? An Interview with Ed McNicholas

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Does Cybersecurity Law Work Well?  An Interview with Ed McNicholas

By Daniel J. Solove

“The US is developing a law of cybersecurity that is incoherent and unduly complex,” says Ed McNicholas, one of the foremost experts on cybersecurity law. 

McNicholas is a partner at Sidley Austin LLP and co-editor of the newly-published treatise, Cybersecurity: A Practical Guide to the Law of Cyber Risk (with co-editor Vivek K. Mohan).   The treatise is a superb guide to this rapidly-growing body of law, and it is nicely succinct as treatises go.  It is an extremely useful volume that I’m delighted I have on my desk.  If you practice in this field, get this book.  

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Sunken Safe Harbor: 5 Implications of Schrems and US-EU Data Transfer

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

sunken safe harbor

By Daniel J. Solove

In a profound ruling with enormous implications,the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has declared the Safe Harbor Arrangement to be invalid.

[Press Release]  [Opinion]

The Safe Harbor Arrangement

The Safe Harbor Arrangement has been in place since 2000, and it is a central means by which data about EU citizens can be transferred to companies in the US.  Under the EU Data Protection Directive, data can only be transferred to countries with an “adequate level of protection” of personal data.  The EU has not deemed the US to provide an adequate level of protection, so Safe Harbor was created as a work around.

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Phishing Your Employees: 3 Essential Tips

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Phishing Training

A popular way some organizations are raising awareness about phishing is by engaging in simulated phishing exercises of their workforce.  Such simulated phishing can be beneficial, but there are some potential pitfalls and also important things to do to ensure that it is effective.

1. Be careful about data collection and discipline

Think about the data that you gather about employee performance on simulated phishing.  It can be easy to overlook the implications of maintaining and using this data.  I look at it through the lens of its privacy risks.  This is personal data that can be quite embarrassing to people — and potentially have reputational and career consequences.  How long will the data be kept?  What will be done with it?  How securely will it be kept?  What if it were compromised and publicized online?

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6 Great Films About Privacy and Security

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

title image

By Daniel Solove

I previously shared 5 of my favorite novels about privacy and security, and I’d now like to share 6 of my favorite films about these topics — because I just couldn’t whittle the list down to 5.

I was thinking about my favorite films because I’ve been putting together a session at my Privacy+Security Forum event next month — the “Privacy and Security Film and TV Club” — where a group of experts will share their favorite films and TV series that have privacy and security themes.

Without further ado, here are my film choices:

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PCI Training: Reducing the Risk of Phishing Attacks

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

PCI Training Payment Card Data Risks

PCI Logo PCI TrainingThe Payment Card Industry (PCI) Security Standards Council recently released a helpful short guide to preventing phishing attacks.  Merchants and any other organization that accepts payment cards most follow the PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).  One of the requirements of the PCI DSS is to train the workforce about how to properly collect, handle, and protect PCI data.

A major threat to PCI data is phishing, with almost a third targeted at stealing financial data.

PCI Training Phishing Statistics

According to a stat in the PCI Guide, Defending Against Social Engineering and Phishing Attacks,: “Every day 80,000 people fall victim to a phishing scam, 156 million phishing emails are sent globally, 16 million make it through spam filters, 8 million are opened.”

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Start with Security: The FTC’s Data Security Guidance

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

FTC Start with Security 03

Recently, the FTC issued a short guide to what organizations can do to protect data security.  It is called Start with Security  (HTML) — a PDF version is here.  This document provides a very clear and straightforward discussion of 10 good information security measures.  It uses examples from FTC cases.

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Why HIPAA Matters: Medical ID Theft and the Human Cost of Health Privacy and Security Incidents

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Why HIPAA matters

By Daniel J. Solove

Whenever I go to a doctor and am asked what I do for a living, I say that I focus on information privacy law.

“HIPAA?” the doctors will ask.

“Yes, HIPAA,” I confess.

And then the doctor’s face turns grim.  At first, it looks like the face of a doctor about to tell you that you’ve got a fatal disease.  Then, the doctor’s face crinkles up slightly with disgust. This face is so distinctive and so common that I think it should be called “HIPAA face.”  It’s about as bad as “stink eye.”

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5 Things the FTC Should Do to Improve Data Security in the Wake of Wyndham

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Federal Trade Commission - FTC - Data Security

Over at Fierce IT Security, Professor Woodrow Hartzog and I have a new essay, 5 Things the FTC Should Do to Improve Data Security in the Wake of Wyndham The piece discusses some enforcement strategies we believe the FTC should use to maximize its effectiveness in improving data security.  Our suggestions include:

  1. Do more proactive enforcement
  2. Take on more data security cases
  3. Push companies toward improved authentication – moving beyond mere passwords
  4. Restrict the use of Social Security numbers for authentication purposes
  5. Develop a theory of data stewardship for third parties

Please check out our essay for our explanation of the above agenda and a lot more detail.

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New Security Training Program: Social Engineering: Spies and Sabotage

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Module Data Security Spies and Sabotage 02

I am pleased to announce the launch of our new training program, Social Engineering: Spies and Sabotage. This course is a short module (~7 minutes long) that provides a general introduction to social engineering.

After discussing several types of social engineering (phishing, baiting, pretexting, and tailgaiting), the course provides advice for avoiding these tricks and scams. Key points are applied and reinforced with 4 scenario quiz questions.

Social Engineering Training Spies 01

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The High Cost of Phishing and the ROI of Phishing Training

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Phishing Training 01

A study recently revealed that nearly 25% of data breaches involve phishing, and it is the second most frequent data security threat companies face.  Phishing is an enormous problem, and it is getting worse.

Phishing threats -- Verizon report 2015 threats

In a staggering statistic, on average, a company with 10,000 employees will spend $3.7 million per year handling phishing attacks.

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The FTC Has the Authority to Enforce Data Security: FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp.

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

FTC 01by Daniel J. Solove

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit just affirmed the district court decision in FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp., No. 14-3514 (3rd. Cir. Aug. 24, 2015).  The case involves a challenge by Wyndham to an Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enforcement action emerging out of data breaches at the Wyndham.

Background

Since the mid-1990s, the FTC has been enforcing Section 5 of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. § 45, in instances involving privacy and data security.  Section 5 prohibits “unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce.”  Deception and unfairness are two independent bases for FTC enforcement.  During the past 15-20 years, the FTC has brought about 180 enforcement actions, the vast majority of which have settled.  Wyndham was one of the exceptions; instead of settling, it challenged the FTC’s authority to enforce to protect data security as an unfair trade practice.

Among the arguments made by Wyndham, three are most worth focusing on:

FTC PNG 02a(1) Because Congress enacted data security laws to regulate specific industries, Congress didn’t intend for the FTC to be able to regulate data security under the FTC Act.

(2) The FTC is not providing fair notice about the security practices it deems as “unfair” because it is enforcing on a case-by-case basis rather than promulgating a set of specific practices it deems as unfair.

(3) The FTC failed to establish “substantial injury to consumers” as required to enforce for unfairness.

The district court rejected all three of these arguments, and so did the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals.  Here is a very brief overview of the 3rd Circuit’s reasoning.

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Should the FTC Kill the Password? The Case for Better Authentication

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

title image

Co-authored by Professor Woodrow Hartzog.

Authentication presents one of the greatest security challenges organizations face. How do we accurately ensure that people seeking access to accounts or data are actually whom they say they are? People need to be able to access accounts and data conveniently, and access must often be provided remotely, without being able to see or hear the person seeking access.

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OPM Data Breach Fallout, Fingerprints, and Other Privacy + Security Updates

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

OPM Fallout

By Daniel J. Solove

Co-authored by Professor Paul Schwartz

This post is part of a post series where we round up some of the interesting news and resources we’re finding. For a PDF version of this post, and for archived issues of previous posts, click here. We cover health issues in a separate post.

general devels

News

Mayer Brown survey of executives: 25% of organizations lack both a CPO and CIO (March 2015)

stats

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Security Experts Critique Government Backdoor Access to Encrypted Data

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Data Ballby Daniel J. Solove

In a recent report, MIT security experts critiqued calls by government law enforcement for backdoor access to encrypted information.  As the experts aptly stated:

“Political and law enforcement leaders in the United States and the United Kingdom have called for Internet systems to be redesigned to ensure government access to information — even encrypted information. They argue that the growing use of encryption will neutralize their investigative capabilities. They propose that data storage and communications systems must be designed for exceptional access by law enforcement agencies. These proposals are unworkable in practice, raise enormous legal and ethical questions, and would undo progress on security at a time when Internet vulnerabilities are causing extreme economic harm.”

The report is called Keys Under Doormats: Mandating Insecurity by Requiring Government Access to all Data and Communications and is by Harold Abelson, Ross Anderson, Steven M. Bellovin, Josh Benaloh, Matt Blaze, Whitfield Diffie, John Gilmore, Matthew Green, Susan Landau, Peter G. Neumann, Ronald L. Rivest, Jeffrey I. Schiller, Bruce Schneier, Michael Specter, and Daniel J. Weitzner.

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Mr. Robot: My Review of the New TV Series

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Mr Robot 01by Daniel J. Solove

I’ve really been enjoying the new TV series Mr. Robot on USA. Network.  It presents highly-engaging depictions of hacking and social engineering, and it is great entertainment for privacy and security  geeks.

Mr Robot 05aThe protagonist is Elliot Alderson (played by Rami Malek), a tech who works at a cybersecurity firm in New York City.  The show is narrated with voiceover by Elliot, and we get a glimpse into the mind of this reclusive and quiet person.  Voiceover can often falter as a technique, but here it works wonderfully — and all the more impressive because Elliot speaks softly, often in monotone.  But Elliot is such a fascinating character and Malek delivers Elliot’s monologue so effectively, that it becomes surprisingly engaging.

Elliot is very smart and clever, and he sees many around him as idiots.  He suffers from severe bouts of depression, is a recluse who wants to be invisible, and he is very awkward around other people.  He lives most of his life inside his head.  The show presents the stark contrast between what he says to others and what he is thinking.  In one scene, we see him speaking to his psychiatrist, telling her hardly anything.  But we hear his thoughts and know that he is pondering quite a lot.
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The OPM Data Breach: Harm Without End?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

title image

By Daniel J. Solove

The recent breach of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) network involved personal data on millions of federal employees, including data related to background checks. OPM is now offering 18 months of free credit monitoring and identity theft insurance to victims. But as experts note in a recent Washington Post article, this is not nearly enough:

If the data is in the hands of traditional cyber criminals, the 18-month window of protection may not be enough to protect workers from harm down the line. “The data is sold off, and it could be a while before it’s used,” said Michael Sussmann, a partner in the privacy and data security practice at law firm Perkins Coie. “There’s often a very big delay before having a loss.”

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Cybersecurity in the Boardroom

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

??????????

by Daniel J. Solove

A few days ago, I posted about how boards of directors must grapple with privacy and cybersecurity.   Today, I came across a survey by NYSE Governance Services and Vericode of 200 directors in various industries.

According to the survey, about two-thirds of directors are less than confident about their company’s cybersecurity.  This finding is not surprising given the frequency of data breaches these days.  There is a growing sense of exasperation, as if we are living in an age of a great plague, with bodies piling up in the streets.

Plague 01

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Boards of Directors Must Grapple with Privacy and Cybersecurity

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

title image

By Daniel J. Solove

Privacy and cybersecurity have become issues that should be addressed at the board level. No longer minor risks, privacy and cybersecurity have become existential issues. The costs and reputational harm of privacy and security incidents can be devastating.

Yet not enough boards are adequately engaged with these issues. According to a survey last year, 58% of members of boards of directors believed that they should be actively involved in cyber security. But only 14% of them stated that they were actively involved.

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The Sony Data Breach: 3 Painful Lessons

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

 

sony blog 1

by Daniel J. Solove

The Sony data breach is an exclamation mark on a year that is already known as the” Year of the Data Breach.” This data breach is the kind that makes even the least squeamish avert their eyes and wince. There are at least three things that this breach can teach us:

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Privacy and Security Developments 2014 Issue 1

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

privacy and security update

by Daniel J. Solove

Issue 2014 No. 1

This post is co-authored with Professor Paul M. Schwartz.

We spend a lot of time staying up to date so we can update our casebooks and reference books, so we thought we would share with you some of the interesting news and resources we’re finding. We plan to post a series of posts like this one throughout the year.

For a PDF version of this post, click here.

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Heartbleed: A Data Security Bug of Titanic Proportions that Affects Most of the Internet and that Will Have Enormous Implications

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

heartbleed blog 1

by Daniel J. Solove

It sounds like a late April Fool’s joke, but it isn’t. Heartbleed, a data security bug in Open SSL, allows hackers to access personal data and encryption keys. This vulnerability has existed for 2+ years, and there is no way to know if your data has been compromised. And the majority of websites that encrypt use OpenSSL, such as the most popular banking and retail sites. This is a security flaw of titanic proportions. According to CNN: “Researchers discovered the issue last week and published their findings on Monday, but said the problem has been present for more than two years, since March 2012. Any communications that took place over SSL in the past two years could have been subject to malicious eavesdropping.”

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