All posts tagged Cloud Computing

Clearing Up the Fog of Cloud Service Agreements

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

cloud

Contracting with cloud service providers has long been a world shrouded in fog. Across various organizations, cloud service agreements (CSAs) are all over the place, and often many people entering into these contracts have no idea what provisions they should have to protect their data.

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Modernizing Electronic Surveillance Law

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

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By Daniel J. Solove

Next year, there will be a milestone birthday for the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) – the primary federal law that regulates how the government and private parties can monitor people’s Internet use, wiretap their communications, peruse their email, gain access to their files, and much more.

This is no ordinary birthday for ECPA. In 2016, ECPA turns 30. Little did anyone think that in 1986, when ECPA was passed, that it would still remain largely unchanged for 30 years. In 1986, the Cloud was just something in the sky. The Web was what a spider made.

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Lessons from the Latest HIPAA Enforcement Action

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

HIPAA Training OCR Enforcementby Daniel J. Solove

Recently, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) publicized its resolution agreement in its HIPAA enforcement action against St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center (SEMC).  SEMC agreed to pay $218,000.

The case began with a complaint filed with OCR back in 2012 that employees were sharing PHI of nearly 500 patients via an online sharing application without a risk analysis on such activities being undertaken.  OCR investigation found that the medical center “failed to timely identify and respond to the known security incident, mitigate the harmful effects of the security incident and document the security incident and its outcome.”

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Big Data and Our Children’s Future: On Reforming FERPA

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Double check

by Daniel J. Solove

Last week, the White House released its report, Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values. My reaction to it is mixed. The report mentions some concerns about privacy with Big Data and suggests some reforms, but everything is stated so mildly, in a way designed to please everyone. The report is painted in pastels; it finesses the hard issues and leaves specifics for another day. So it is a step forward, which is good, but it is a very small step, like a child on a beach reluctantly dipping a toe into ocean.

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Our Privacy and Data Security Depend Upon Contracts Between Organizations

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

contracts between organizations blog 1

by Daniel J. Solove

Increasingly, companies, hospitals, schools, and other organizations are using cloud service providers (and also other third party data service providers) to store and process the personal data of their customers, patients, clients, and others. When an entity shares people’s personal data with a cloud service provider, this data is protected in large part through a contract between the organization and the cloud service provider.

In many cases, these contracts fail to contain key protections of data. For example, a study conducted by Fordham School of Law’s Center on Law and Information Policy revealed that contracts between K-12 school districts and cloud service providers lacked essential terms for the protection of student data. I blogged about this study previously here.

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The Battle for Leadership in Education Privacy Law: Will California Seize the Throne?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Blank chalkboard and stack of books

by Daniel J. Solove

This post was co-authored by Professor Paul Schwartz, Berkeley Law School.

Education was one of the first areas where privacy was regulated by a federal statute. Passed in the early 1970s, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) was on the frontier of federal privacy regulation. But now it is old and ineffective. With the growing public concern about the privacy of student data, states are starting to rev up their engines and become more involved. The result could be game-changing legislation for the multi-billion dollar education technology industry.

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