All posts in Social Media

HIPAA Cartoon on Social Media Use

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

HIPAA Cartoon Social Media

Here’s a cartoon on HIPAA and social media use to jump start your week.  You can’t think enough about HIPAA these days.  HIPAA audits are back, and OCR is having a vigorous enforcement year this year, something I plan to post about soon.

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K-12 Schools Must Teach Data Privacy and Security

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

K-12 Schools Must Teach Data Privacy and Security

By Daniel J. Solove

It is essential that children learn about data privacy and security.  Their lives will be fully enveloped by technologies that involve data.  But far too little about these topics is currently taught in most schools. 

Fortunately, there is a solution, one that I’m proud to have been involved in creating.  The Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe), a nonprofit group of policy leaders, educators, and various experts, has released the Privacy K-12 Curriculum Matrix.

The Privacy K-12 Curriculum Matrix is free.  It can be used by any school, educator, or parent.  It contains an overview of the privacy issues that should be taught, including which details about each issue should be covered in various grade levels.  It includes suggestions for appropriate learning activities for each grade level.

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Jennifer Lawrence’s Nude Photos and Civil Rights Law: An Interview with Danielle Citron

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Online Harm

“It is a sexual violation. It’s disgusting.
The law needs to be changed, and we need to change.”
Jennifer Lawrence on her nude photos being
non-consensually disclosed online

Fairly recently, Jennifer Lawrence’s iCloud account was hacked and her private nude photos were stolen and posted online. She was mortified.

Her case is just one of many, according to Professor Danielle Citron (University of Maryland School of Law), who very recently published a book about online harassment, Hate Crimes in Cyberspace (Harvard University Press 2014).

Citron - Hate Crimes in Cyberspace

It is a compelling and provocative book. It is a bold book. And as the recent news stories indicate, it is a book that couldn’t be more timely and more needed. One might think that online harassment is rare. Who would write such mean and vile things? What kind of person would harass Zelda Williams, the daughter of Robin Williams, who was viciously attacked online immediately after her father’s death? Even Caligula would show more humanity.

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Follow Professor Solove on Social Media

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

If you are interested in privacy and data security issues, there are many great ways Professor Solove can help you stay informed:

Professor Solove’s LinkedIn Influencer blog

LinkedIn Influencer 02 You can follow Professor Solove on his blog at LinkedIn, where he is an “LinkedIn Influencer.”  He blogs about various privacy and data security issues. His blog has more than 600,000 followers.

LinkedIn Influencer 01

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Professor Solove’s Twitter Feed

Twitter 01Professor Solove is active on Twitter and posts links to current privacy and data security stories and new scholarship, cases, and developments of note.

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Professor Solove’s Newsletter

Newsletter 01Sign up for our newsletter where Professor Solove provides information about his recent writings and new training programs that he has created.

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Professor Solove’s LinkedIn Discussion Groups

Please join one or more of Professor Solove’s LinkedIn discussion groups, where you can follow new developments on privacy, data security, HIPAA, and education privacy issues. You can also participate in the discussion, share interesting news and articles, ask questions, or start new conversations:

Privacy and
Data Security
HIPAA Privacy
and Security
Education Privacy
and Data Security
Image Group LinkedIn Logo Education Privacy 01 Image Group LinkedIn Logo HIPAA 01 Image Group LinkedIn Logo Privacy Security 01

Being a Juror Can Result in a Huge Loss of Privacy

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

being a juror blog 1

by Daniel J. Solove

For trial attorneys, a key component to winning is carefully selecting people for the jury and tailoring arguments to best influence, nudge, or perhaps even manipulate jurors into reaching a particular verdict. As a result, there is a hunger to learn about the private lives of jurors, and serving on a jury can entail a huge loss of privacy.

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10 Reasons Why Privacy Matters

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

why privacy matters 1

by Daniel J. Solove

Why does privacy matter? Often courts and commentators struggle to articulate why privacy is valuable. They see privacy violations as often slight annoyances. But privacy matters a lot more than that. Here are 10 reasons why privacy matters.

1. Limit on Power

Privacy is a limit on government power, as well as the power of private sector companies. The more someone knows about us, the more power they can have over us. Personal data is used to make very important decisions in our lives. Personal data can be used to affect our reputations; and it can be used to influence our decisions and shape our behavior. It can be used as a tool to exercise control over us. And in the wrong hands, personal data can be used to cause us great harm.

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Employers and Schools that Demand Account Passwords and the Future of Cloud Privacy

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Passwords 01by Daniel J. Solove

In 2012, the media erupted with news about employers demanding employees provide them with their social media passwords so the employers could access their accounts. This news took many people by surprise, and it set off a firestorm of public outrage. It even sparked a significant legislative response in the states.

I thought that the practice of demanding passwords was so outrageous that it couldn’t be very common. What kind of company or organization would actually do this? I thought it was a fringe practice done by a few small companies without much awareness of privacy law.

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Employer Social Media Policies: A Brave New World

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Posted by Daniel J. Solove

Social Media Policies and TrainingThe frequent use of social media by employees has created a new domain of risk for employers – employees who reveal confidential or sensitive information or who otherwise say things that damage their institution’s reputation or create strife with their colleagues.

For example, in the healthcare context, in a number of widely-publicized incidents, employees revealed confidential information about patients on their blogs and social network profiles. For example, according to a Boston Globe story, an emergency room physician posted data online about the patient. The physician thought that it was safe to post about as long as she did not include the patient’s name. But others could identify the patient.  There are numerous recent cases where hospital staff have posted photos and other information about patients online.

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Do Young People Care About Privacy?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Posted by Daniel J. Solove

A common argument I hear is that young people just don’t care about privacy.  If they cared about privacy, why would they share so much personal data on Facebook?  Why would they text so much?  Why would they be so cavalier about their privacy?  Privacy will be dead in a generation, the argument goes.

This argument is wrong for several reasons.  Studies show that young people do care about privacy.  A few years ago, a study by Chris Hoofnagle and others revealed that young people’s attitudes about privacy didn’t differ much from older people’s attitudes.   A more recent study sponsored by Microsoft found that “[p]rivacy and security rank as college students’ #1 concern about online activity.”

But what accounts for the behavior of sharing so much personal data online?  First, young people—especially teenagers—might not be thinking through the consequences of their actions.  It doesn’t mean they will never care about privacy; they might care about privacy at a point in the future.

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