All posts in GLBA

Understanding the FTC on Privacy and Security

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Privacy Training Blog FTC

by Daniel J. Solove

Privacy Awareness Training Blog TRUSTe FTC WebinarI recently held a webinar about the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for TRUSTe called Understanding the FTC on Privacy and Security.   The webinar is free and is archived at TRUSTe’s site.

Here is a brief synopsis of the webinar:

For the past nearly two decades, the FTC has risen to become the leading federal agency that regulates privacy and data security. In this webinar, Professor Daniel J. Solove will discuss how the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is enforcing privacy and data security.  What are the standards that the FTC is developing for privacy and data security?  What sources does the FTC use for the standards it develops?

A common misconception is that the FTC’s jurisprudence has been rather thin, merely focuses on enforcing promises made in privacy policies. To the contrary, a deeper look the FTC’s jurisprudence demonstrates that it is quite thick and has extended far beyond policing promises. The FTC has codified certain norms and best practices and has developed some baseline privacy and security protections. The FTC has laid the foundation for an even more robust law of privacy and data security. Professor Solove will discuss some of the potential ways this body of regulation could develop in the future.

My webinar was written up at the Wall Street Journal.  If you’re interested in seeing it, it’s free and available here.   Below is some background about the FTC as well as some of my writings about the FTC that may be of interest if you want a deeper dive.

Continue Reading

Follow Professor Solove on Social Media

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

If you are interested in privacy and data security issues, there are many great ways Professor Solove can help you stay informed:

Professor Solove’s LinkedIn Influencer blog

LinkedIn Influencer 02 You can follow Professor Solove on his blog at LinkedIn, where he is an “LinkedIn Influencer.”  He blogs about various privacy and data security issues. His blog has more than 600,000 followers.

LinkedIn Influencer 01

*    *    *    *

Professor Solove’s Twitter Feed

Twitter 01Professor Solove is active on Twitter and posts links to current privacy and data security stories and new scholarship, cases, and developments of note.

*    *    *    *

Professor Solove’s Newsletter

Newsletter 01Sign up for our newsletter where Professor Solove provides information about his recent writings and new training programs that he has created.

*    *    *    *

Professor Solove’s LinkedIn Discussion Groups

Please join one or more of Professor Solove’s LinkedIn discussion groups, where you can follow new developments on privacy, data security, HIPAA, and education privacy issues. You can also participate in the discussion, share interesting news and articles, ask questions, or start new conversations:

Privacy and
Data Security
HIPAA Privacy
and Security
Education Privacy
and Data Security
Image Group LinkedIn Logo Education Privacy 01 Image Group LinkedIn Logo HIPAA 01 Image Group LinkedIn Logo Privacy Security 01

How the FTC Can Readily Halt Identity Theft

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

ftc halts identity theft blog 1

by Daniel J. Solove

Identity theft is terrible crime, and it can wreak havoc on victims’ lives. In an identity theft, the thief uses a victim’s personal information to improperly access accounts, obtain credit in the victim’s name, or impersonate the victim for other purposes.

But there is an effective way to stop a lot of identity theft, and the legal framework is already in place to do it. In a relatively short time, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) could prevent a significant amount of identity theft – perhaps even a majority of it – and no new laws need to be passed.

I know that it might be hard to believe – as hard to believe as a suitcase filled with a million dollars just sitting abandoned on the sidewalk – but it is quite true.

Before I explain how, I need to provide some background.

Continue Reading

The FTC and the New Common Law of Privacy

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Bby Daniel J. Solove

I recently posted a draft of my new article, The FTC and the New Common Law of Privacy (with Professor Woodrow Hartzog).

You can download it for free on SSRN.

One of the great ironies about information privacy law is that the primary regulation of privacy in the United States has barely been studied in a scholarly way. Since the late 1990s, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has been enforcing companies’ privacy policies through its authority to police unfair and deceptive trade practices. Despite more than fifteen years of FTC enforcement, there is no meaningful body of judicial decisions to show for it. The cases have nearly all resulted in settlement agreements. Nevertheless, companies look to these agreements to guide their privacy practices. Thus, in practice, FTC privacy jurisprudence has become the broadest and most influential regulating force on information privacy in the United States – more so than nearly any privacy statute and any common law tort.

Continue Reading

New Financial Privacy Training Programs

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

by Daniel J. Solove

We have begun producing a new program series about financial privacy.  The first two programs are completed.

The first part is an overview video that discusses the importance of financial privacy and the various laws and regulations that regulate.  These laws and regulations are discussed very broadly.  The video concludes with some key best practices for protecting financial data.  This video is made in a unique style — an animated piece of currency.

The second program focuses on the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA).  The video discusses the GLBA’s scope, notice, confidentiality, data sharing, and security.  The video also explains why protecting the privacy and security of financial data is important.

Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act Privacy Training GLBA

There are interactive materials and quiz questions to accompany the video.