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Follow Professor Solove on Social Media

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

If you are interested in privacy and data security issues, there are many great ways Professor Solove can help you stay informed:

Professor Solove’s LinkedIn Influencer blog

LinkedIn Influencer 02 You can follow Professor Solove on his blog at LinkedIn, where he is an “LinkedIn Influencer.”  He blogs about various privacy and data security issues. His blog has more than 600,000 followers.

LinkedIn Influencer 01

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Professor Solove’s Twitter Feed

Twitter 01Professor Solove is active on Twitter and posts links to current privacy and data security stories and new scholarship, cases, and developments of note.

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Professor Solove’s Newsletter

Newsletter 01Sign up for our newsletter where Professor Solove provides information about his recent writings and new training programs that he has created.

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Professor Solove’s LinkedIn Discussion Groups

Please join one or more of Professor Solove’s LinkedIn discussion groups, where you can follow new developments on privacy, data security, HIPAA, and education privacy issues. You can also participate in the discussion, share interesting news and articles, ask questions, or start new conversations:

Privacy and
Data Security
HIPAA Privacy
and Security
Education Privacy
and Data Security
Image Group LinkedIn Logo Education Privacy 01 Image Group LinkedIn Logo HIPAA 01 Image Group LinkedIn Logo Privacy Security 01

The Stunning Need for Improvement on Mobile and Cloud Risks

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cloud and Mobile 02by Daniel J. Solove

A recent study by the Ponemon Institute, The Risk of Regulated Data on Mobile Devices and in the Cloud*, reveals a stunning need for improvement on managing the risks of mobile devices and cloud computing services. The survey involved 798 IT and IT security practitioners in a variety of organizations including finance, retail, technology, communications, education, healthcare, and public sector, among others. The results are quite startling.

The study concluded that “the greatest data protection risks to regulated data exist on mobile devices and the cloud.” 69% of respondents listed mobile devices as posing the greatest risk followed by 45% who listed cloud computing.

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